DCTV

NYC. 1972. An affordable media arts resource center is born. 40 years later, we're still making movies, and we can help you make yours too. - dctvny.org -

Tomorrow! Tracy Droz Tragos and Martha Shane talk Rich Hill at DCTV! Come!

Film Poster of Agnès Varda in California: 5 Films Made in USA.

Film Poster of Agnès Varda in California: 5 Films Made in USA.

(Source: shihlun, via keyframedaily)

This goes down on Thursday!

Martha Shane (co-Director of After Tiller) will be talking to Tracy Droz Tragos (co-Director of Rich Hill) @ DCTV on Thursday 7/31 as part of  Talkhouse Film conversations! Get pumped!

(Source: dctvny)

cinephiliabeyond:

An excellent video essay that illustrates how two of Coen brothers’ films parallel and diverge from each other in the portrayals of their law(wo)men.

In retrospect, this snowbound crime drama seems like a warm-up for No Country For Old Men in much the same way Akira Kurosawa’s Kagemusha laid the groundwork for Ran. Here’s the thing: Kagemusha is still a great movie—and more intimate in it way than its epic follow-up—and so is Fargo, which may lack the mythic pull of No Country, but makes up for it with two unforgettable lead characters, played by William H. Macy and Frances McDormand, who together express the Coens’ vision of the world. Both come from common Minnesota stock, but one is petty and small, acting out on a cowardly instinct to take control of his life, and the other is the embodiment of simple decency, forging a private paradise with her husband out of fricassee and three-cent stamps. —Primer: The Coen Brothers by Scott Tobias

Joel and Ethan Coen discuss the writing and filming of Fargo, its precise characterizations, acting performances and the visual style that emphasizes the spiritual landscape of the bleak Midwestern setting. —The Coen Brothers: Fargo, Crime and Realism

The Coen brothers’ approach to storyboarding is well documented; were there any significant spontaneous moments you would like to share, instances in which the filming departed from the storyboards?
The storyboards are continually developed as we prep a film and usually incorporate what the locations have to offer by the time we get to shooting. There were some spontaneous changes to the storyboards based on the light and so on, but not many. Quite often we shoot fewer shots than are boarded as we see how one shot can work for more than might have been intended. We played a scene between the two sheriffs in a different shot to the ones boarded. It was raining that night and, partly to save time and because I liked the idea of the two profiles in silhouette, we shot the scene in the one angle against the rear wall of the coffee shop. I think that if and when something changes it is, most often, to connect or simplify the coverage.

The motel-room scene with Ed Tom and Chigurh invites multiple viewings and much speculation as to the literal, physical presence of Chigurh behind the door when Bell walks into the room. Would you care to comment as to your reading of this scene? Is the viewer to see Chigurh as the “ghost” Ed Tom references, or is there a more practical answer to this mystery?
I think the book is as elusive as the film on this point, but Chigurh is evil and, perhaps, the devil. Whether he’s something or someone who we ourselves have created or just a reflection of our own fears, we don’t know. —Just a cameraman: An Interview with Roger Deakins

Dear every screenwriter, read this: Joel and Ethan Coen’s screenplays for Fargo  and No Country for Old Men. Based on the Novel by Cormac McCarthy.

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Tender Tuesday: This cat is not enjoying its first day out of the house.

Martha Shane (co-Director of After Tiller) will be talking to Tracy Droz Tragos (co-Director of Rich Hill) @ DCTV on Thursday 7/31 as part of  Talkhouse Film conversations! Get pumped!

Check out DCTV Member Sasha Wortzel at Newfest this year with We Came to Sweat and Grit and Grind!

Check out DCTV Member Sasha Wortzel at Newfest this year with We Came to Sweat and Grit and Grind!

A reminder: DCTV Presents will co-present with The Talkhouse Film a conversation with Rich Hill co-director Tracy Droz Tragos and a special surprise guest documentarian! July 31st at DCTV. More deets here.

A reminder: DCTV Presents will co-present with The Talkhouse Film a conversation with Rich Hill co-director Tracy Droz Tragos and a special surprise guest documentarian! July 31st at DCTV. More deets here.

(Source: dctvny)

RADIOHEAD’S MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACKS

A Brief History of Radiohead at the Movies – The Dissolve

A few months after the turn of the millennium, unrecognizable new Radiohead recordings were uploaded to Napster, the first songs from the band’s then-unreleased fourth album crackling across the crude peer-to-peer service like scattered transmissions from a distant alien planet. Around that same time, the band’s official website was reborn as a random series of white slides and black text, each of which contained its own uniquely cryptic message. Buried in the seemingly endless parade of pages was one that read:

“every bad act
is stored on a magnetic tape
which we retain. kept in a secret vault
and evaluated
repeated and repeated with your code name
at the top of the file.
to be reviewed at your departure
for the pearly gates.” 

In November of 2006, during a webcast recorded from England’s Maida Vale studios, Radiohead lead singer and dominant persona Thom Yorke sat at a piano and plunked out a spartan ballad called “Videotape,” which began with the lyrics, “When I’m at the pearly gates, this’ll be on my videotape.” The song would eventually find a home as the closing track on Radiohead’s 2007 album, In Rainbows, but neither in the seven years between its conception and its recording, nor in the seven years since, has Yorke confirmed that “Videotape” was inspired by After Life, Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda’s 1998 humanistic masterpiece about a bureaucratic way station for the recently departed. In the spartan and serene rooms of the film’s heavenly office, the dead are instructed to select a single memory from their lives. At the end of one week’s time, the subjects each star in a filmed re-creation of their chosen moment, disappearing into that perfect scene for all eternity. 

Odds are that Yorke will never confirm the inspiration. The general affability of the band’s members is always subsumed by the mercurial genius of their frontman, and longtime Radiohead fans are keenly aware that you’d sooner get an original-sounding song out of Chris Martin than you would a straight answer out of Thom Yorke. The truth of the matter is ultimately irrelevant, but the possible connection between Kore-eda’s film and Radiohead’s song nevertheless hints at the answer to a different set of questions altogether: Why isn’t the band’s music used in movies very often, and why is it almost never used well? 

THIS ARTICLE CONTINUES ON THE DISSOLVE.

(via truthandmovies)